Serbia's 67-year-old Dragisa Kosnic could be world's oldest footballer

AFP
Dragisa Kosnic. Photo: AFP

Most footballers hit their physical peak in their 20s and by the time they are in their 30s, their legs grow weak and careers wind down. Only a select few manage to play organised football into their 40s but almost no one does it for as long as Serbia´s Dragisa Kosnic has done.

The football fanatic, nearly 67 years old, is still going strong and has no plans to quit the game he has loved and played all his life.

He plays week in, week out in Serbia´s official football league, which requires rigorous medical tests to check his fitness before each season.

He says that he doesn´t know of any other players of his age in the same position -- his teammates tend to be young enough to be his grandchildren.

Kosnic, or "Kole" as he is known, plays for his hometown team in northeastern Serbia, Proleter Medja, which is currently in the league´s sixth division.

Dragisa Kosnic. Photo: AFP

Loading up his decades-old Yugo car with shabby football boots and tattered shin pads, he heads to the same uneven pitch he played his first league match on in 1968.

"I believe that there are no registered players (of my age), and if there are, I´d like to meet them and play a game," Kosnic told AFP, before a match late last month.

The stocky defensive midfielder admits that he can´t always keep up with his teammates, the youngest of whom is 50 years his junior.

"I play more by ´reading the game´, so I know when to start running, when to stop and when to sprint," he said.

"Although the next day and two days after (the match), my muscles are sore, I limp a little, so I soak in a hot bathtub, and after two days, I´m ready to play again."

Dragisa Kosnic. Photo: AFP

Kosnic lives in the village of Medja in the same ramshackle house in which he was born.

He receives a pension of less than 130 euros ($153) a month and also keeps a couple of goats and sheep.

In the late 1970s when Kosnic, who also used to coach players, was at the peak of his footballing career he played for another team, Proleter Zrenjanin.

The club competed in the former Yugoslavia´s second division but managed to eliminate that season´s champions Hajduk Split in a cup match in 1978.

Inspired by the roaring crowd, Kosnic shone on the pitch and said that afterwards he was approached by Hajduk to join the elite Croatian club.

Dragisa Kosnic. Photo: AFP

But, luck was not on his side - four days later he fractured his leg in another match, an injury that he blames for ruining his career at the age of 25.

Although doctors advised Kosnic against ever playing again, less than a year later he was back on the pitch and has not stopped since.

Today he is not as quick as he used to be but still manages some key moves that helped his team win 2-1 against a local rival.

Kosnic says that he has a frugal, mainly dairy-based, diet.

"I never cut out milk. Every day, a litre at least.

"I eat eggs, nothing much. When there is meat, I eat it, I eat what I have," he said.

Serbia's 67-year-old Dragisa Kosnic could be world's oldest footballer